Francis Molua Mwambo

Research themes
  • Institutions
  • Methods
  • New Technologies
Research countries
  • Ghana
Thesis title

Energy efficiency of biomass production

Thesis abstract

With the continuously growing global population, agricultural intensification involving the cultivation of high-yielding crop varieties combined with the application of fertilizers, pesticides, and irrigation has been proposed as a panacea to global food security. But such strategy will likely be constrained by the rapidly increasing global energy demand in agriculture. Consequently, it is imperative to analyse the energy efficiency of value webs in developing countries, since much of the population growth and problem of food insecurity commonly occur in these countries. However, the existing methods of energy efficiency are limited for analyzing agricultural systems as commonly practiced in developing countries especially considering land use and including the input energy from human and draft animal power. Tackling the problem from a sustainable development standpoint has provoked the need for an alternative method for the analysis of energy efficiency in African agricultural landuse schemes. The aim of this research work package in the BiomassWeb Project (funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research; BMBF) is to conceive a comprehensive and scale-sensitive assessment framework that improves energy efficiency and land use, including ecosystem services decision making and policy planning in agriculture.

Doctoral research funded by

BMBF

Supervisors of
doctoral work

PD Dr. Christine Fürst

2014

Francis Molua Mwambo and Christine Fürst. 2014. A framework for assessing the energy efficiency of non-mechanised agricultural systems in developing countries. In Marx Gómez, J., Sonnenschein, M., Vogel, U., Winter, A., Rapp, B. and Giesen N.(eds.) Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on In. Further Information

Junior Researcher

E-Mail:
mwambof(at)gmail.com

Phone:
+49-228-73-1897/4930

Department:
ZEF C: Department of Ecology and Natural Resources Management